CRAFT TRAINING 

Education

Education - Craft Training


Millwright

Millwrights (a) install machinery and equipment according to layout plans, blueprints, and other drawings in an industrial establishment using hoists, lift trucks, hand tools, and power tools; (b) read blueprints and schematic drawings to determine work procedures; dismantles machines, using hammer, wrenches, crowbars, and other hand tools; (c) move machinery and equipment using hoists, rollers, and trucks; assembles and in-stalls equipment, such as shafting, conveyors, and tram rails, using hand tools and power tools; (d) construct foundations for machines, using hand tools and building materials, such as wood, cement, and steel; (e) align machine and equipment, using hoists, jacks, hand tools, squares, rules, micrometers, and plumb bobs; (f) assemble machines and bolts, welds, rivets, or otherwise fastens them to foundation or other structures, using hand tools and power tools; (g) may repair and lubricate machines and equipment.


Pipefitting

Pipefitting involves measuring, cutting, bending, and joining lengths of pipe to lay out, assemble, install, and maintain pipe systems, pipe supports, and related hydraulic and pneumatic equipment for steam, hot water, heating, cooling, lubricating, sprinkling, and industrial production and processing systems. Working in this field requires the ability to read blueprints, knowledge of building code requirements, and general construction knowledge so as to prevent obstructions with electrical wiring and ensure that the piping system will operate correctly when construction is complete. Saws, pipe cutters, pipe-bending machines, soldering tools, and pressure gauges are power tools used to create piping systems from plastic, glass, steel, or copper.


Heavy Equipment & Mobile Crane

Operators, HEO is divided into dirt and hook. Dirt work refers to the operation of a variety of specialized equipment to excavate, grade, and prepare land for building roads, structures, and bridges or for digging trenches to lay/repair pipelines. Dirt HEOs also spread asphalt and concrete for road construction or for building of foundations. Hook or Crane work refers to the operation of a variety of specialized equipment capable of lifting hundreds of tons of materials (hanging from a hook) to heights of several hundred feet. Modern cranes are computerized and utilize joysticks to control movement. HEOs must set up and inspect their equipment, make adjustments to improve job safety and machinery performance, and make minor repairs to the equipment at times. The equipment is operated by moving levers, foot pedals, switches, or joysticks. Technology, in the form of computerized controls, improved hydraulics, and electronics, requires highly-skilled operators (As an example, Global Positioning Systems are used for grading and leveling work.) HEOs work outdoors, in all types of climates and conditions. The weather or stage of the project may require equipment operators to work irregular hours (around the clock/very early in morning or late at night). Some equipment can be noisy, shake, and jolt the operator. Operating the equipment can be dangerous, making the adherence to safety procedures imperative for the operator's safety as well as all personnel on site. Working in this field requires a basic knowledge of engine mechanics; courses in science and mechanical drawing are also helpful. HEOs often obtain a commercial driver's license (CDL) so as to haul equipment to the various job sites.


Core Skills

All ABC training begins with learning the core skills of the industry. However, before beginning your craft training, taking such high school courses as English, algebra, geometry, mechanical drawing, and blueprint reading would be a great benefit.

At ABC, your craft training will begin with learning the core skills that provide the foundation needed to work for all the other crafts in the NCCER curriculum. These skills include: math, basic communication, introduction to blueprint reading, the proper use of power tools, and especially safety. Once you've mastered the core skills, it's time to begin the courses related to your specific craft. All of the courses combine learning in the classroom with hands-on training, and most will require a commitment to keep learning in the future-or what we call "lifelong learning." The following is a look at some of the most popular construction crafts across the country.


Electrical & Instrumentation

Electricians bring the power to our homes and workplaces. In the industrial environment, instrumentation equipment has become more electronics-based and instrumentation technicians share some of the same roles and responsibilities as traditional electricians. Both often work on the calibration of equipment and are responsible for the wiring that runs between the control room and the field. ABC electrical and instrumentation involves two to four years of training and may also include apprenticeship programs. This training includes working from blueprints and installation of high voltage electronics, as well as low voltage systems for video, fiber optics, and DSL lines. You will also learn about strict safety precautions, and how to follow national, state, and local electric codes. You should also be prepared for lifelong learning to keep up with constantly changing technology. Electricians and instrument techs work basically anywhere electricity is needed and help create all the automation that saves man-hours and makes work a lot easier.


HVAC

HVAC stands for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. It includes the installation, maintenance, and repair of the systems that control temperature, humidity, and total air quality in residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. In the industrial sector, an HVAC technician might also handle large cooling systems and chillers that regulate the temperature of chemicals in the manufacturing process. HVAC classes entail three to five years of formal and informal training. With ABC training you will learn basic electronics, wiring, and the proper installation and operation of HVAC systems. This is another field where technology changes fast and you must be committed to lifelong learning. HVAC technicians work in both the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. It's because of them our buildings are comfortable in regard to temperature, humidity and air quality.


Welding

Welding is the most common form of bonding metal parts together through electric arc, gas arc, heat and pressure, and others. ABC training for a welder can range from a few weeks for low-skill positions to two or three years for highly skilled welding jobs. Welders will learn blueprint reading as well as basic physics, chemistry, and metallurgy. Welders that plan to work in fabrications shops will receive computer training because much of this process is automated. Welders must continuously learn how to bond new metals and materials including plastics and new alloys. As a welder, you could work in a variety of capacities: building bridges, buildings, and structures or joining pipes in pipelines, plants, and refineries. This craft is extremely important and one of the backbones of the construction industry.


Heavy Equipment Operator (Excavation)

The construction industry is full of big jobs that call for big equipment. That means highly skilled men and women are needed to use this equipment to move dirt, rocks, and other materials to build foundations and highways, dig trenches, lay pipelines, and hoist heavy construction materials. Today's modern equipment is technologically advanced with computerized control and electronics that make these machines extremely complicated. ABC's specialized heavy equipment and excavation courses consist of two to three years of training. Through this training you'll learn not only how to operate equipment ranging from small excavators and skid loaders to large bulldozers and cranes, but also how to sight-judge the density of the materials handled. You'll also learn how to follow safety practices and procedures and must be committed to keeping up with modern equipment changes and updates in technology. As a Heavy Equipment Operator, you could work in residential, commercial, or industrial areas and you will most likely work outside in all weather and climate conditions. Some people choose to specialize in one family of equipment while others choose a variety of them. In construction, all jobs start at dirt level, so there's always a need for highly skilled heavy equipment operators.



Sponsors
Ace Enterprises / Ace Waste

Ace Enterprises / Ace Waste

Alliance Safety Council

Alliance Safety Council

Boh Bros. Construction Company, LLC

Boh Bros. Construction Company, LLC

Bottom Line Equipment

Bottom Line Equipment

Cajun Industries

Cajun Industries


CB&I

CB&I

Doggett Machinery

Doggett Machinery

EXCEL Contractors, Inc.

EXCEL Contractors, Inc.

Fluor Enterprises, Inc.

Fluor Enterprises, Inc.

Group Industries, LLC

Group Industries, LLC


Hannis T. Bourgeois, LLP CPA's

Hannis T. Bourgeois, LLP CPA's

ISC Constructors

ISC Constructors

Jacobs

Jacobs

James Construction Group

James Construction Group

Lapco

Lapco


Louisiana CAT

Louisiana CAT

MMR

MMR

Pala Group

Pala Group

Performance Contractors

Performance Contractors

RES Contractors

RES Contractors


Triad Electric & Controls

Triad Electric & Controls

Turner Industries Group

Turner Industries Group

United Rentals

United Rentals

Vector Electric

Vector Electric

Westgate

Westgate


Whitney Bank

Whitney Bank

Workbox

Workbox

Ardent Services LLC

Ardent Services LLC

BIC Alliance

BIC Alliance

PBC Industrial Supplies

PBC Industrial Supplies


Plant Performance Services

Plant Performance Services

Regions Insurance

Regions Insurance

American Gateway Bank

American Gateway Bank

Bancorp South Insurance Services

Bancorp South Insurance Services

Bengal Crane & Rigging

Bengal Crane & Rigging


Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson

Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson

CLP Resources, Inc.

CLP Resources, Inc.

DXP

DXP

Gulf Coast Occupational Medicine

Gulf Coast Occupational Medicine

Hargrove Engineers + Constructors

Hargrove Engineers + Constructors


Lafarge

Lafarge

MED-PRO

MED-PRO

OneSource EHS

OneSource EHS

Repcon, Inc.

Repcon, Inc.

The Reynolds Company

The Reynolds Company


Tolunay Wong

Tolunay Wong